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The Official Workout Thread

934 posts in this topic

Here it is!

I'm currently trying to find an office setup where I can exercise while sitting at a computer all day. What form of cardio do you think would be the easiest to put a desk over? Recumbent bike?

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I'm not really huge on the whole lifting thing anymore but I'll repost one of my posts that stated all the basics for what I followed and would follow again if I get back into it

Okay… big post comin up. I have been asked a few times by people to give them some tips/pointers or what I’ve done so I decided I’d write it all out for them and might as well post it hereI’ve said the same shit many times here before, but now it’s all in one nice post.

Note: this is the way I train, and what I believe works best for me out of everything I’ve tried. I’ve tried a fair different methodologies, NOT “routines,” this is about HOW to train, not what exercises to do in what order, that doesn’t matter unless it’s something overly idiotic.

1. The Training

a. Keep it simple. Unless it’s a spec phase, I rarely do isolation exercises (mainly any exercise that uses low weight).

b. Always move the weight as fast as you possibly can. Power is the name of the game. Someone who lifts 200 pounds in half a second has more power than someone who does it in ¾ of a second, and that is every bit as significant as lifting more weight. In fact with this approach, you can get the same muscle stimulation from various weights. As long as it isn’t like throwing a whiffle ball, the power generated will remain the same… more on this later

c. Low reps. Each rep is important, training is just a bunch of reps strung together. It’s the fundamental unit of lifting, and every single one is important. This is why it’s better to keep the reps low, you can make sure you get as much as you can out of every rep. The higher the reps go, the greater percentage of them will get sloppy. There are more positives. It’s better to lift a heavy weight 5 times with one rep sets than a lighter weight in once 5 rep set, the former is more work done in total.

d. Fuck rest intervals. Don’t time yourself. You’ll learn how much rest you need. Don’t rest too long and waste time, don’t rest too short that you hinder your performance. So… just rest until you feel you can complete the next set. Makes sense no?

e. Warming up. Do not spend lots of time warming up. You will drain yourself. The lifting method I use requires very little warmup. I’ll usually do some dynamic stretches, something to get the blood flowing/activate the muscles (knee jumps, twitch reps). Then I’ll go through the lifting motion with a low weight to get a feel for it. That’s mostly it.

f. Then the lifting… What I do (and will do for a long time for the core foundation of my training) is start at a weight 50-60% of my usual xRM, and then add weight (10, 15, 20, or 30 pounds depending on the exercise) and perform another set at x reps. I continue this until I reach a weight where I can still control the weight firmly, but know that the next set would be TOUGH (but still possible). I do 3-6 reps (for any exercise on any day keep the reps the same as you increase the weight).

This is a FANTASTIC method for lifting:

- it ensures that you will not overtrain.

-it trains explosiveness (at lower weights) and strength (at higher weights)

-it will show progress (or lack thereof) honestly

-It prevents injury

-the first time lifting like this you will probably find that your last set is heavier than it would have been had you been doing something like a 5x5 with all the sets at same weight

-it primes the nervous system, but does not fatigue it. Nervous system fatigue KILLLS progress, and 99% of people cannot tell when the nervous system is overtrained

Anyway, there are other things I do that spawn off of this idea:

-after the last set, back the weight off 20% and go for max reps

-or, I pick the reps to be 3, after my last set of 3 back the weight off and then do sets of 5 varying the weight slightly each time.

-I usually superset antagonistic muscles for upper body. (note: maybe not “superset” in the classical meaning, I take regular breaks between sets still)

This is all based off of most of the stuff I’ve read from Christian Thibaudeau, and is influenced heavily by his Olympic lifting background. As far as the splits go, I recommend making sure each major muscle group is hit at least twice a week, and for spec phases 3 times a week while backing the other muscles groups off to once a week. Other than that the rest is personal preference.

2. FOOOD/MONEYSINKS

This is pretty straight forward. I think most people understand what healthy food is (aside from carb choices, this seems to get lots of people myself included, without direction)

Basics: Protein spread throughout the day evenly, carbs mostly in the morning/early afternoon and fats later afternoon/evening.

Here is my guideline that I follow, it varies slightly from day to day but nonetheless:

Breakfast: oats mixed with blueberries and cinnamon, protein shake w/ raw egg

Mid morning: apple, cottage cheese, yogurt, banana

Lunch: Chicken/turkey, rice/potatoes/whole wheat pasta, veggies

Afternoon: some tuna or any meat I can find, nuts, random fruits maybe (this one varies most)

Supper: fattier meats, more vegetables, salads etc

Before bed: protein shake w/ olive oil, some flaxseeds

I take fish oil and vitamin D daily

Workout supplementation:

Again, I keep it really simple. The cheapest/most effective method I’ve found to be is…

30 minutes pre workout: 5g creatine, some fast carbs/protein

-20 drink as much of a carb/protein mixture (ON recovery is what I’ve used the most)

-5 same as above

0 start workout

10 min continue drinking recovery throughout workout

30 AFTER workout, 5g creatine, and if you feel like it and have the money, a 100% whey shake.

I usually mix up ~1.5 litres of the recovery stuff at the beginning. Often I use it at the -30 mark too for the fast carbs/protein.

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Aside from a little cardio, all I do is follow this and this. Surprised my arms have bulked up a little bit from the push ups. There was no muscle on them anyway so I guess thats why. Can't afford a gym membership :( I need to sort out a proper diet though for losing weight.

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Okay, I think I am prepared for the working out part of my life change I want to have. My roommate is an Athletic Trainer and can help me design a workout to fit my needs. Plus that 100 pushups workout seems pretty sweet as an extra before bed workout or when I can't make it to the gym because of class/work etc.

Its the eating right that I am not prepared for. I can't cook for shit. On top of that, I would mostly be cooking for myself.

Does anybody know of an guide for easy to cook healthy meals? One that guides you through even the groceries you need to shop for?

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Okay, I think I am prepared for the working out part of my life change I want to have. My roommate is an Athletic Trainer and can help me design a workout to fit my needs. Plus that 100 pushups workout seems pretty sweet as an extra before bed workout or when I can't make it to the gym because of class/work etc.

Its the eating right that I am not prepared for. I can't cook for shit. On top of that, I would mostly be cooking for myself.

Does anybody know of an guide for easy to cook healthy meals? One that guides you through even the groceries you need to shop for?

Healthy meals usually taste like crap (maybe not crap -- but bland as shit). I'm sure someone can post a list of healthy foods in general, but in terms of actually cooking it: steaming veggies, poaching chicken/fish/veg, or grilling chicken/fish/veg all work well because you won't need to use oils/butters/any other type of fat for cooking. Grilling is always going to give you a ton of flavor compared to the other two methods. Oh and you can microwave stuff (bleh). I can't do it though, I love butter or olive oil in a lot of foods I cook. Just sayin'

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I'm not really huge on the whole lifting thing anymore but I'll repost one of my posts that stated all the basics for what I followed and would follow again if I get back into it

This is a great post. Read it, n00bs.

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Cardio sucks.

I do love the after effects of a nice morning run though. Even though I practically have to drag myself outta bed for it. Gonna suck in a month when it's balls cold outside.

I noticed it does reduce the fatigue I get when I lift though. Sometimes I don't workout for 5-6 days due to laziness, and it sucks the next week. The cardio helps though, I just hate it.

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The gym is full of weirdos. Seriously, some guys just come to the gym to stare.

Edit:

So i'm about to start University again and will have to change my workout routine. I've been able to pull off 5 day weeks but this will have to change to 3/4 days. Here is my routine at the moment:

Monday - Chest

Bench Press

Incline Dumbbell Press

Dumbbell Flyes

Cable Crossover at various heights

Tuesday - Legs

Squats

Stiff Leg Deadlift

Leg Extensions

Leg Curls

Wednesday - Arms

Dips

Barbell Curl

Overhead Cable Extensions

Hammer Curl

*Any ideas how to improve my bicep exercises?*

Thursday - Rest

Friday - Back

Deadlift

Lat Pulldown

Bent-over Row

Reverse Chest Flye (Not sure if that's the correct name)

Saturday - Shoulders

Standing Military Press

Shrugs

Dumbbell Lateral Raise

Barbell Front Raise

Feel free to rip into my routine, but it seems to be working out quite well for me. Now, i need to cut it down so it fits into a 3 day workout; any ideas?

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I've been told by people both here and teh realities to ignore isolated movements until I can at least bench, dead and squat my body weight (plus some). Right now my routine looks like this:

Workout A:

Squat

Standing military press

Pullups

Workout B:

Bench press

B/o Row

Pullups

I can't deadlift at the moment, but when I start to again, workout B will be bench, dead, b/o row.

So a regular week for me might look like:

Monday: Workout A

Tuesday: Workout B

Wednesday: Rest

Thursday: Workout A

Friday: Rest

Saturday: Workout B

Sunday: Rest

Or it might not. I might work the Saturday and not get to the gym, but I'm trying to get in at least three times a week. I'm eating like a horse (trying for four meals) and having a protein shake every day.

I dunno Thornton, it seems like maybe you're over complicating it. Plus, with a simple routine that use two or tree compound movements per workout, you can be in and out of the gym in 30-45 mins.

ALSO, for the first time today I swapped round which movements I did first. Normally I'd squat and then press, but this morning I did military press first. Felt good, lots of energy. I'm normally whacked after squatting, but going into the squat after the press I felt nice and loose rather than knackered as I normally feel going into the press.

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Okay, I think I am prepared for the working out part of my life change I want to have. My roommate is an Athletic Trainer and can help me design a workout to fit my needs. Plus that 100 pushups workout seems pretty sweet as an extra before bed workout or when I can't make it to the gym because of class/work etc.

Its the eating right that I am not prepared for. I can't cook for shit. On top of that, I would mostly be cooking for myself.

Does anybody know of an guide for easy to cook healthy meals? One that guides you through even the groceries you need to shop for?

(I know you asked for a guide, and this isn't one, but maybe it will inspire you...)

I don't know anything about lifting, but I do know how to make fast healthy meals that actually taste good! You can take would-be bland foods and spice them up with very simple dressings. When I steam veggies, I have two go-to dressings that taste really good on just about anything, and are good for you.

1) 1 part low sodium soy sauce, 2 parts water

fresh crushed garlic

chili paste or sauce

a bit of sugar

splash of sesame oil

(all to taste, just play around)

2) a little extra virgin olive oil

sea salt

fresh cracked black pepper

roasted or sauteed garlic

You can do little things to make your meals more interesting, like caramelizing your onions instead of just sauteing them, roasting your own garlic, making your own pasta sauce etc. (I've heard of putting ground flaxseed in marinara sauce for extra protein...never tried it though).

Look into different grains, like wheat burgol, whole wheat cous cous, and quinoa (lots of protein for a grain) so you don't get bored of pasta, rice, and potatoes.

Getting high quality oils can really make a difference in taste, and the oils I normally use (sesame, toasted sesame, and extra virgin olive) are healthy fats with lots of flavor.

Use garlic, onions, peppers, herbs (i like rosemary, oregano, and basil) and spices (i mostly use black pepper, garam masala, ginger, chinese five spice) to add flavor instead of overdoing it on oils/butter.

My favorite healthy dessert option is some high quality semi sweet or dark chocolate...you would be surprised how little you need to not crave more, unlike with crappy chocolate. I guess cutting out sweets altogether would be better, but you have to at least enjoy what you're eating, right?

Anyway, I'm sure someone who tailors their nutrition to exercise could give you better advice on nutrient proportion, but hopefully this at least gives you a few simple ideas about how to make healthy foods not boring.

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What?? Jer isn't into lifting anymore? Care to explain???

When I do things I do them with 110%. For many months I carried on with this at 85% and I just wasn't feeling it anymore. I no longer desired to get bigger, and was getting incredibly sick of it being the first thing anyone would talk about with me when first introduced/small talk, the only attention it gets is from other guys trying to do the same thing who ask for advice and then say that sounds stupid. Half of my clothes no longer fit, the remaining were uncomfortable. I was hungry as fuck every 2 or 3 hours and that got to be annoying.

Ya these are all lame excuses, i am running out of time. There is more, stress/anxiety shit that I was dealing with (not related to lifting), I wrote my mcat this summer and before that basically locked myself in my room with books.

cliffnotes: i'm a pussy

That being said I miss the psychological benefits it provided, so I'm trying to get back into it but every time I lift I get nauseous. Working on this atm, think I have it figured out. I'm just taking it easy right now, lifting every other day for 20-30min.

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Haven't been to the gym in like 5-6 days SHIT !!! working 55+ hours a week is screwing with my routine

michael, one big change you need to make is put arm days last, or at least definitely after back.

i personally go:

chest

back

legs

shoulders

i only have 4 days, and don't do any arm exercises, but thats just me... if i had a 5th day, i would do swimming or something to stretch my muscles... i've been convinced arm days are useless other than maybe 1-2 iso exercise at the end of one of my major days.

when working your back you are also working your biceps as a secondary muscle... so if your secondary muscle is fatigued from the day before its totally going to fuck up your back day.

also just from a quick glimpse of your workout sounds like you are doing a lot of work on your front delts and not a whole lot on your back delts...

i personally would replace the barbell front raise with bent back delt raises... you work your front delts pretty hard with bench press and your other shoulder exercises where you *probably* don't need to do the front barbell raise... plus, i don't know about you, but that exercise hurts my fuckin neck. anyways, hitting those rear delts definitely give your upper back a fuller look... if you ever see anyone in the gym that has a rounded back and a build chest its cause they never hit their rear delts.

also for back days, you should try doing the standard seated rows, its a very good all around workout.

and if you want a good tricep exercise, i'd try out skullcrushers.

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Haven't been to the gym in like 5-6 days SHIT !!! working 55+ hours a week is screwing with my routine

michael, one big change you need to make is put arm days last, or at least definitely after back.

i personally go:

chest

back

legs

shoulders

i only have 4 days, and don't do any arm exercises, but thats just me... if i had a 5th day, i would do swimming or something to stretch my muscles... i've been convinced arm days are useless other than maybe 1-2 iso exercise at the end of one of my major days.

when working your back you are also working your biceps as a secondary muscle... so if your secondary muscle is fatigued from the day before its totally going to fuck up your back day.

also just from a quick glimpse of your workout sounds like you are doing a lot of work on your front delts and not a whole lot on your back delts...

i personally would replace the barbell front raise with bent back delt raises... you work your front delts pretty hard with bench press and your other shoulder exercises where you *probably* don't need to do the front barbell raise... plus, i don't know about you, but that exercise hurts my fuckin neck. anyways, hitting those rear delts definitely give your upper back a fuller look... if you ever see anyone in the gym that has a rounded back and a build chest its cause they never hit their rear delts.

also for back days, you should try doing the standard seated rows, its a very good all around workout.

and if you want a good tricep exercise, i'd try out skullcrushers.

Thanks for the advice.

I'll start replacing my arm days with cardio, add the seated rows/bent back delt raises and I'll try to add some arm iso exercises at the end of my chest/back workout.

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This is my basic workout guide and it has worked well for me.

I. Diet

-Keep a daily food journal and track protein intake, carbohydrate intake, fat intake, and caloric intake.

-Ingest ~1 gram of protein per lean pound of body mass you have. For instance, if you weigh 100 lbs. and are 15% body fat, then you should consume around 85 grams of protein daily to cover your 85 lbs. of lean body mass.

-Keep fat intake at around 20% of your daily caloric intake. To calculate the percentage for fat, carbohydrates, or protein, simply multiply by either 4, or 9. For fat, multiply the total grams you have consumed by 9 and that is the total number of fat calories you have taken in. For carbohydrates and protein multiply the total grams by 4. For example, if you eat 30 grams of fat in a day, multiply 30 x 9 and you have consumed approximately 270 fat calories.

-The rest of your diet should consist of carbohydrates, preferably complex carbohydrates. Be sure to eat from a wide variety of foods as this will provide you with the most nutritionally complete diet. Try to consume foods with lower GI values (glycemic index) as these foods take longer for the body to metabolize and convert to sugar. Excess sugar in the bloodstream will be stored as fat. This is why it is important to avoid foods which are quickly converted to sugar, especially if you aren't planning to be active shortly after consuming it and burning it off.

-Some people bulk in the off-season and cut during the season, but I believe that a wildly fluctuating body mass is unhealthy. It is possible to gain lean muscle and burn fat simultaneously. It means adopting a healthy lifestyle and exercising right.

-Do not consume too much animal protein (less than 20% of your daily protein intake). Many people think that only high quality protein will suffice when they are lifting heavy, this is simply not true. High quality protein has all of the essential amino acids, but there is significant evidence to suggest that complete "high quality" proteins allow for rapid cancer progression and other serious ailments. Stick to fish, avoid dairy products, especially casein (a protein from cow's milk which is found in milk, yogurt, cottage cheese, cheese, etc.). Eat poultry in moderation, and mostly consume fish since this tends to be lean and protein rich. You can and should derive most of your protein from vegetables, legumes, nuts, fruits, etc.

-When eating eggs, eat mostly egg whites, but be sure to include some egg yolk. People are often intimidated by eggs because they contain 70% of your daily suggest cholesterol intake. Don't be afraid, nature is wise. Eggs have a phospholipid called lecithin which inhibits the body's ability to absorb cholesterol. In a study done over many years with thousands of nurses, those who ate 2 eggs a day had no greater risk of heart attack or other problems than those nurses who did not. Always remember that dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol are not the same. Eggs still apply to the rule I mentioned before about not consuming too much animal protein.

-Eat plenty of protein rich vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, etc.

-Soy is a great source of protein, don't be scared off by those who claim it is a phyto-estrogen and will give you "bitch-tits." They subscribe to a certain kind of "broscience" which should be ignored. Also be aware that reports of the health risks associated with soy all stem from one source. That said, don't consume too much soy, because like anything, too much of a good thing can have negative consequences. I usually stick to 2 servings per day with my cereal. That is 18 grams of protein. When shopping for soy milk stick to brands which don't list carageenan in their ingredients. One such product is WestSoy's plain vanilla soy milk with a whopping 9g of soy protein per serving. In some measures, soy protein and whey protein tie as the most effective protein source for the body.

-Whey protein supplements are great. Try to stick to isolates because they are more effective than concentrates. However, concentrates are cheaper, so if you can find a good mixture do so. I recommend Optimum Nutrition's 100% whey protein. Have a shake immediately after your workout as this is when your body becomes highly catabolic and wants to regenerate damaged muscle tissue. Also, one before bed is a good idea since your body is most catabolic while you sleep.

-Don't worry about when you eat what, and don't rule out specific food groups. Simply eat things in moderation. If you like beef, go ahead and indulge once in a while, but keep it within your daily limitations, and do not eat it every day. You will become quite good at tracking your dietary intake, needs, and goals if you keep a daily food journal.

-If you want to look ripped, you should shoot for a body fat percentage of ~5%.

II. Cardio

-Soccer and swimming will probably give you the most bang for your buck when it comes to cardio. Soccer, by its very nature, has the right mixture of anaerobic (sprinting), aerobic (jogging), and cool-off (walking) periods to build your cardiovascular system quickly. Swimming involves the use of virtually your entire body and can just as easily include moments of anearobic and aerobic exercise. Swimming has the added advantage that it is very low impact.

-Fartlek drills will increase your speed and VO2 max rapidly.

-Distance running should be eased into. I recommend the Navy Seal's workout for this kind of thing because it eases you into a good running program and ensures that you rest enough to avoid bodily harm. No one wants stress fractures, or what I recently experienced, a condition called plantar fasciitis. Also, if you can, run barefoot in a field of grass. The body was designed to run on its toes, not on the heels. Unfortunately, impacting your heels when you run (as most of us do) can cause damage to your hips, knees, and lower back over time. You can also invest in a pair of barefoot running shoes, but be aware that you'll need to strengthen your feet before using them or else you may end up with stress fractures in your metatarsal bones.

-Biking is a great low impact activity, just look at Lance Armstrong! You can use either a stationary bike, or a real bike, either one will benefit your body tremendously. Doing little things like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or riding your bike to work instead of driving can burn some serious calories.

-Make sure you vary your cardio workouts. Your body wants to remain in a state of homeostasis, it is important to confuse your muscles by switching your routine from time to time. For a couple of weeks you could bike, and the next couple of weeks hit the elliptical. Mixing it up will make it more enjoyable and will give you bigger endurance gains.

III. Strength Training

-There are two basic types of muscle in the body which are called Type I, and Type II, or fast twitch and slow twitch, or even red and white muscle. If you want to be a distance athlete and compete in marathons then you should focus on building Type I muscle, also called slow twitch. This muscle has less power, but more endurance than the Type II variant. Alternatively, if you wish to look like Ronnie Coleman, you should focus on Type II muscle, or fast twitch muscle. This muscle is 85% larger in volume, more powerful, but has much less endurance.

-It is possible to build both Type I and Type II muscle fibers to a point, but you can not be the fastest sprinter in the world and simultaneously the fastest marathon runner in the world. At some point you will have to choose. But, you may still be a damn fast sprinter and run marathons under 3 hours, it will simply take a lot of time, energy, and patience.

-If you do a lot of cardio, be aware that your fast twitch muscles will be more inclined to that kind of exercise as well. Likewise, if you do a lot of heavy lifting, your slow twitch muscle fibers will be inclined towards that kind of exercise.

-Hypertrophy is the name of the game no matter what you do. You must break down the muscle fibers and stimulate the body to rebuild them. Hypertrophy is the body's response to trauma. Typically, when something in the body is broken or torn, it comes back bigger and stronger. If you want to look big, then you will want your fast twitch muscle fibers to hypertrophy.

-To build fast twitch muscle fibers you must lift heavy. The heavier you lift, the more hypertrophy you will experience. This is a complex subject, but understand that if you lift too heavy, you will become very strong, but your muscles won't grow to look the way you want them to. There is a reason the world's strongest men tend to look chunky while bodybuilders tend to look sculpted. Bodybuilders lift less weight with more reps to tear up as many muscle fibers in a muscle group as possible. This inspires hypertrophy in the entire muscle group which gives their bodies the sculpted look. Powerlifters on the other hand tend to exhaust a small number of muscle fibers within a muscle group which causes these fibers to grow, leaving the others less developed. Arnold Schwarzenegger believed that a good lifter should do both kinds of lifting.

-To build a sculpted body building physique aim for a weight which will allow you to complete 8-10 reps on a specific muscle group. Be sure to target the muscle group, use GOOD form, and don't cheat. Cheating involves muscle groups outside the target area, meaning the target muscles are not working as hard as they should be.

-To build power, lift enough weight that you can only complete 3-7 reps on any given muscle group. Some great power lifting exercises include squats, deadlifts, and the bench press. These movements use numerous muscle groups which increases testosterone, cardiovascular health, and burns a lot of calories.

-Lifting weights often burns more calories than cardio workouts.

-Lifting weights strengthens bones, ligaments, and tendons. Many women have osteoporosis because they lead sedentary lifestyles which leads to bone density decreases.

-Always vary your workout routine to keep it interesting, and to keep your muscles confused. The same routine over and over will hinder your progress.

-Don't spend hours in the gym. Go in hard, bang out your routine and get out as quickly as possible. Your body recovers 72% of its strength within 1 minute between sets, do not wait longer than 1-2 minutes between sets. Keep your heart rate up, and keep your muscles fatigued, this inspires growth. As they say - no pain, no gain.

-Workout muscle groups no more than twice per week. Depending upon how hard you workout, you may be able to manage once per week. For instance, you could do your chest every Monday and still see massive gains. Most power lifters only do their bench press once per week and they lift upwards of 800 lbs!

-Working out too often or too long can lead to over training. If your body is unable to repair the damage of your previous workout before your next one, you will not see much, if any growth. I read once about a man who nearly died from over training. He was in the hospital and the doctors discovered high levels of lactic acid in his bloodstream, in addition to highly damaged muscles.

-Eat before you hit the gym, and eat when you return. You do not have to eat big meals, but consume both complex carbohydrates and protein. Your body needs carbohydrates to process protein properly (as we all know from the infamous Atkin's Diet). Many people have only protein, which is pretty much just going to be excreted in their urine.

My workout routine is as follows:

Monday: Pushing muscles (chest, triceps, shoulders) and abdominals.

Tuesday: Pulling muscles (biceps, back, forearms) and cardio (swimming, rowing, running). Sometimes Futsal.

Wednesday: Legs and abdominals. Soccer

Thursday: Pushing muscles (chest, triceps, shoulders) and abdominals.

Friday: Pulling muscles (biceps, back, forearms) and cardio (swimming, rowing, running).

Saturday: Legs and abdominals. Soccer

My last tip: Never make excuses for not going to the gym or eating right. I work an 84 hour work week when I'm on shift, and I still manage to hit my dietary goals and the gym, you can too!

Good luck!!

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Got my gym membership about 2 weeks ago. Trying to get into a rhythm. I'm trying to lose about 10 15 pounds to start out. And i've been doing cycling classes whenever i can attend. That shit fucks me up. I burn around 600-900 calories in about 45 minutes. I love it. Especially when the person leading the class chooses good music. Haha. If i can't get into the class than i do about 5 miles on a bike machine and 3 miles on elliptical. But i usually do interval stuff so. I've heard High intensity interval training is an ideal way to lose weight. So i usually will do the random hill programs and get my heart rate up there in the 170s. I want to lift weights but i currently have some fucked up upper back muscles and neck and i need to fix that before i start getting into a lifting routine.

I gotta work on my diet. I've eliminated any soda and stay away from all fast food during the week. I have the hardest time staying disciplined. I need to find foods i like. I hate almost all vegetables. Eating somewhat healthy is tough. I need to cut down my portions.

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Got my gym membership about 2 weeks ago. Trying to get into a rhythm. I'm trying to lose about 10 15 pounds to start out. And i've been doing cycling classes whenever i can attend. That shit fucks me up. I burn around 600-900 calories in about 45 minutes. I love it. Especially when the person leading the class chooses good music. Haha. If i can't get into the class than i do about 5 miles on a bike machine and 3 miles on elliptical. But i usually do interval stuff so. I've heard High intensity interval training is an ideal way to lose weight. So i usually will do the random hill programs and get my heart rate up there in the 170s. I want to lift weights but i currently have some fucked up upper back muscles and neck and i need to fix that before i start getting into a lifting routine.

I gotta work on my diet. I've eliminated any soda and stay away from all fast food during the week. I have the hardest time staying disciplined. I need to find foods i like. I hate almost all vegetables. Eating somewhat healthy is tough. I need to cut down my portions.

If you just ease into vegetables slowly you'll find they become more delicious with time. I couldn't handle raw spinach at first, now I really like it. Also, whole cucumbers with the skin is a real treat now!

As far as keeping yourself disciplined, it can be very difficult. Most people have cheat foods they use. Some people even opt to have one day out of every week where they eat whatever they want, this makes it easier to stay disciplined the rest of the week. Cutting out soda is a big step, congratulations.

My cheat foods are:

Nutty Guys Cinnamon Toffee Almonds

Busch's Honey Baked Beans

Grapes

Life Cereal with WestSoy Plain Soy Milk

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