The Deadly Rhythm

The "Books You Are Currently Reading or Just Finished" Thread

656 posts in this topic

I'm reading a book called Look Me In The Eye: My Life With Asperger's by John Elder Robinson. I'm reading it for a project I'm doing at school about the syndrome, which is basically high-functioning autism. It's a sad book, but it's also surprisingly funny. The author has had a pretty interesting life, even working with KISS for a while as the guy who was designing Ace Frehley's exploding guitars.

I can't decide what to read next. I have Guns, Germs and Steel, Creative Capitalism (a conversation with Bill Gates, Warren Buffet etc) or The Living Cosmos (a book about astronomy and exobiology). I also started Fight Club a while ago and haven't gotten to it yet. I don't get to read for pleasure nearly as often anymore now that I'm back in school. Sucks.

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Started reading The Island by Aldous Huxley a few days ago. I'm about 80 pages in thus far, and I'm pretty hooked. I feel like I'm reading this book at really well suited point in my life. It's not an incredibly difficult read, but Mr. Huxley certainly does make a point of dropping all kinds of philosophies, mantras, proverbs, and religious ideologies directly into the text, including those which he's created himself within the context of the story, from the islanders' Utopian way of life. I've been looking up the unfamiliar ones as I go along, and none of it seems too daunting, being that I haven't felt the need to explore them too deeply, and don't really think that it's required for me to better understand what I'm reading. I feel like I just need to be familiar with them on some basic level. I'm looking forward to something of a very climactic ending, since I've read that Huxley includes an account of his personal experience with LSD through the protagonist in the novel. Supposedly he thought it to be an incredibly enlightening and religious experience at the time, which was all the more important and affecting than any of his experiences with mescaline which he wrote about in detail in The Doors of Perception. Many believe that Huxley was first introduced to mescaline by Aleister Crowley, but there is debate on the subject.

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Just finished reading The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. I'd highly recommend it to anyone that's a fan of Sci-Fi. It's a miltary Sci-Fi novel, similar in a sense to something like Starship Troopers.

It was written in 1974, so definitely some major themes of the Vietnam War are prevalent throughout. No spoilers, it's about a young soldier who is drafted into the military to fight against a race of recently discovered aliens. They use collapsed stars as a kind of way to travel hundreds of light years away in seconds. So due to the time dilation, a few years fighting the aliens in another galaxy is hundreds of years to the soldiers. The protagonist witnesses all the crazy changes that happen to human civilization over a long period of time.

It's a very easy book to get into, I think I went through it in just a couple days. Brutal violence, cool depictions of the armor/weapons/training, and a very interesting look into the future of humanity.

Ridley Scott is planning on making it into a movie after he does the Alien Prequels.

So basically, read this if you like Sci-Fi, it's a classic.

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Not sure at all as I'm trying to find out for myself right now.

I can imagine that being the case.

My mom read Gone, Baby, Gone without knowing there was any possible backstory.

But the characters are GREAT in the 1st book and they're developed so well that I don't know how you can go into Gone, Baby, Gone without it.

The direct sequel to Gone, Baby, Gone comes out on November 2nd called Moonlight Mile.

Takes place 10 years afterwards.

So I'm going to haul ass trying to get caught up before then.

At the very least, read the 1st book...it's a QUICK read and it's really short.

Started it today - liking it so far. Really easy read.

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I graduated in May.

I've had no job since then.

All I do each day is read sports articles and shit as if that's my job.

I read more than enough.

It always surprises me when there's a new sports writer I didn't know about.

Usually you KNOW about the good sports books and sportswriters, even the good beat writers, out there by word of mouth. To release a sports book that uses Howard Zinn's title and to have heard nothing about it? Seems weird.

Maybe once a year or so I'll discover a new sportswriter that is consistently good and interesting.

Hasn't happened this year though.

So like I said: Maybe I will check it out.

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I am currently reading Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris and The Nature of Necessity by Alvin Plantinga. Two vastly different books. Sedaris' book leaves much to be desired after the hilarity that was Me Talk Pretty One Day, though I must admit it is far from terrible. Plantinga's book is dense and slow-going, but I find it incredibly interesting. The wit that he brings to the highly analytic modal logic that he is doing is much appreciated :) .

In the past two days I've rented six or so books from the library and received four or five more as gifts from one of my buddies. I have plenty of reading material for a long while.

Edited to fix a typo.

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It started out awesome... brilliant but equally fun and enjoyable. Then the reliance on Islamic lore started to increase and the pace slowed down because I had to look up a lot of names and such. I didn't mind that because I don't mind looking shit up but a little over half way through (it's like 500 pages) it really started to slow down and the plot is kind of up in the air.. I'm kind of pissed cause the first half was a breeze and I was hoping the second half would be too cause I have so much else to read after this.

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I'm really into "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men." But now that I'm getting paid, I'm going to pick this up:

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A little late to the party. It's apparently been fairly hard to find in DC.

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A review of "The Road" (sort of the book and the film) from my blog, wondered what you guys thought...

Words vs. Pictures - “The Road”

I remember as a little boy reading a book called The Secret of Nihm. I loved it. It was about rats and mice, their home being destroyed by farmers and the baddie rats and stuff. Then I found out an animated film existed, great, right? Well yeah, it was cool. There’s a bit of effort that has to be put into reading that I don’t think is expected of you with a film, so it’s nice to have that option. But they totally butchered the beginning of the book. And so began my love / hate relationship of books adapted for film.

The Road by Cormak McCarthy haunted me something shocking. So bleak. It scared the crap out of me. The whole idea of something happening, a single event, that has such a huge negative effect on a global scale is so, so far out there, it’s not something I think we really have a frame for. Which is where films like I Am Legend and Independence Day come into play. They set themselves within a context of something equally “out there”: a cancer vaccine that turns everyone into rabies fueled flesh munchers or aliens.

The Road doesn’t do that. It doesn’t get into all that crap, it’s just over, and not many people are left. They’ve either gone insane, gone feral or are refusing to give up.

The film captured the bleakness of the book perfectly, it looked exactly as the book painted it. The parts that were added were done with respect and were unintrusive upon the original words. I don’t feel the essence of the conversations was captured genuinely, it just didn’t quite reveal the understanding between the son and the father that the book did. BUT, the book didn’t bring me to tears. The film did. And that is down to Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smith-McPhee. Though the script didn’t do the book justice in places, their work, the exchanged glances, the rage and frustration, the sorrow and loss in their eyes was just crushing.

The film, by no means perfect, was an experience in itself. It bows carefully at the feet of the book, but is also an artifact in it’s own right of the fictional events of the book.

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Just finished Fight Club without ever seeing the movie. Mind Blown.

Really good book.

The adaptation of the book is about as good as it gets.

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This guy is from my town where I'm from back in Massachusetts.

But nobody EVER talks about him or takes pride that he's from there. At all. People know that Denis Leary's from just across the bridge in Worcester because he does charity and takes pride in where he's from.

I hated this book and don't find him funny at all...which sucks, because I so badly want to like him and take pride in the guy.

All the 'funny' stories are true, but they just don't feel well-written or engaging...nor are they that interesting.

They just kind of feel out of order, back and forth, and go nowhere.

Comedians tend to have badly written autobiographies though that don't really translate their comedic skills, so this isn't much different...it just feels half-assed and almost like a ghostwriter came in to translate his jokes to the page.

His comedy is never laugh out loud funny...all the stuff that happens to him is storytelling, but it never feels like he is completely capitalizing on the joke.

I've listened to one of his albums, read his book (which contained most the jokes from that album), and listened to 2 of his podcasts with Adam Carolla, and he just isn't funny/engaging (and he'd even admit this: he feels like he has to be the Larry Bird of comedy because he isn't naturally funny). Even following him on Twitter isn't good either.

I just see him, hear his comedy, and think that I could do a better job in what he does with his storytelling and awkward comedy. I just don't think he capitalizes on things that well.

The best thing that happened to him is his sleepwalking...but it still didn't make me laugh as much as I wanted to. And he's definitely milking it (don't blame him) as he is coming out with a screenplay based on it and he has a 1-man show. So he's known as 'the sleepwalking guy', but I don't know what he has past that that he has to offer. We'll see.

But I just don't think he did my town justice or capitalized on it that well to make it memorable, even if it wasn't and it sucked.

I hope he does well, but he just isn't my taste.

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It's kinda slow if you already know about virus transmission but an overall good read.

Although this made me even more petrified of smallpox.

Next on my list is :

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I did start it but the first chapter was a bit of a bore. The next few chapters seem interesting.

And no....I'm not OCD.

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